VINTAGE MORSE COMMERCIAL DIVING HELMET!

 

DIMENSIONS OF HELMET: 13.5” H
x 14” W   WEIGHT 50 lbs
STAND NOT INCLUDED
Copyright 2006 by Land And Sea Collection, All Rights Reserved.

Presented is an authentic 12 bolt, 3 light Morse Commercial
diving helmet, Serial Number 4673 which dates it Circa 1942/1943. It’s dimpled bonnet shows considerable use and has
a rich dark reddish brown patina that was built over many years. There are some white, yellow, and red paint spatters.
The Morse Commercial helmet was used extensively throughout the world and had many of the features of the Navy MK V including
the distinctive banana exhaust. It differed by having two rectangular side lights, and a screw in front door which in this
case is missing the two knobs, a different shaped breast plate, and a spring loaded lock. The helmet comes from
a collection where it was for the last 13 years.

CONDITION and MARKINGS:  This helmet is left
in essentially  the condition it was used in its last dive in order to preserve its character and history. The knobs
are missing from the screw in front door, and a non-standard telephone speaker is fitted. The front door is frozen in place. It
is being offered as a display item only, and should not be used for any other purpose unless certified by a competent diving
shop.
The number 4673 appears on the top of each braile (strap), and on the inner
and outer ring of the helmet. The helmet was built without a spitcock. The number on the helmet’s neck ring is 467III.
All the air passages inside are intact. The check valve is imprinted with the Morse name.

HISTORY OF MORSE DIVING:
In the arena of deep sea diving, there are few companies with the longevity and history of Morse Diving. 
The company was founded in 1837 as a Boston maker of brassware, three years before Englishman Augustus Siebe manufactured
its first closed air dive helmet. During the Civil War, the firm commenced building maritime fittings and began experimenting
with early underwater hardhat designs from Siebe-Gorman and other pioneering makers. In 1864, Andrew Morse bought out his
partner, introduced his sons into the business, and began to focus on creating new products for underwater salvage expeditions. Morse
was the first company to make the Navy MK V helmet, starting production in 1916.  As their expertise and experience grew
over the years, they developed a worldwide reputation as a major supplier of hardhat diving apparatus.
 
 
 
The oval shaped lead name plate, over painted in white, has is
riveted to the breast plate. It reads:
 
MORSE
DIVING EQUIPMENT
COMPANY
BOSTON, MASS
 
Contrary to some belief Morse used three different shaped tags during
the war years made out of both lead and brass. The chest plate weighs 24 pounds, the helmet 26 pounds, for a total of
50 pounds.

                   
 All Vents Intact
                 
Numbers Match    

 

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OUR GUARANTEE OF SATISFACTION:
If not completely satisfied with your purchase it may be returned, if without damage, within five days of receipt in its original
condition and packaging. Return items must be insured for their full value. A prior email authorization by us for the return
is required. Unfortunately, no refund can be made for the cost of shipping, packaging and handling.

INTERNATIONAL BIDDERS
WELCOME,
but contact us first. We have customers in Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bermuda, Canada, Chile,
China, Denmark, England, France, Germany, Greece, Holland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kuwait, Martinique, Mexico, New
Zealand, Norway, Nova Scotia, Saudi Arabia, Scotland, Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, USVI and the Eastern
Caribbean.
 
ACCEPTED FORMS OF PAYMENT are Bank wire transfer,
cashier’s check, money order, or personal check in which case the item will be held until cleared. No credit cards or PayPal

accepted.
          
Copyright 2006 by Land And Sea Collection, All Rights Reserved.

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