U.S. Naval Officers Sword M1852 High Quality U.S. Made Ca 1912





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U.S. NAVAL OFFICER’S SWORD Model 1852
 
 
 

Presented is M1852 sword that was made in the U.S.A.which is stamped over
a Star of Damascus, nothing on reverse. Original leather scabbard. The metal work on the grip, pommel, and crossguard,
and scabbard is exceptionally fine with sharp edges and even features. The wire wraps over the fish skin cover of
the handle are tight and elegant. All over this sword speaks of the quality of a by gone era. The width of its 3/4 inch blade
tells us that it was made around the turn of the 20th Century and this is borne out by the number 12 on the scabbard bands
giving a make date of 1912.
 
DIMENSIONS: Blade: 3/4 inch wide, 1/8 inch thick, 31 3/4 inches
long, Handle 5 1/8 inches long. Length overall 36 7/8 inches. In scabbard 38 1/4 inches. Weight 2
1/2 pounds
 
Twelve wraps of four strand wire on the white fish skin covered handle. Single
20 1/2 inch fuller. 15 stars in oval. The number of stars in the 1852 design was 13. The number “12” is stamped on both
bands of the scabbard and denotes the year of manufacture.
 
CONDITION: The design on blade is acid etched over nickel plate which has
numerous tiny dark spots which are more pronounced the closer to the point. Almost all the gilding is in place.
The other unusual difference is that on the front and back of the guard is a small sprig or branch of leafs. It is blank metal
in the same place in most other M1852 swords. This sword was never personalized and the designated
area is ready to be engraved. By treaty signed in 1892, the country of origin began to appear on blades.
 

The scabbard’s bands and drag are embellished with a zig-zag design and the top two stamped “12”. There is a single screw
holding each. The gilding on the knots are lightly tarnished. The leather is complete and in  very good condition
with all the stitching tight and intact. There are some nicks and one small tear above the end cap The dolphin
on the drag is mounted with its head on the side away from the hangers per official design. The eagle on the pommel faces
left surrounded by 13 stars.

 
The only difference between the original Model 1852 sword design shown on the left, and that
authorized today, except for changes in materials such as plastic instead of fish skin, and lower quality metalwork, is
that the blade width was decreased

* From 1 1/8 inches to about 1 inch after 1872

* To about 3/4 inch in the later 19th Century,

* To 5/8 inch in today’s Navy. 

The regulations of 1852 had the eagle on the pommel facing right. The use of the officer’s sword
was suspended on 15 October 1942 and was not authorized officially again until 1954.
Source Naval
Historical Center.
 

 

 

     Extra sprig of oak leafs on front guard
       Extra sprig of oak leafs rear
guard
 
The most distinguishing features of this sword is a sprig of extra oak leaves on the front
of the guard and on the back of the guard. These are not authorized in the 1852 regulations nor do they appear on most Navy
sword guards. Our last M 1852, which may have been made by the same maker, had these as well,but they are not common.
 
 
              Heavy chasing of very high quality
 
  Real shark skin and 4 strands of wire wrap

On the top of the blade next to the hilt is stamped “Made
in USA” above an etched Star of Damascus, but no maker is given on the reverse. It’s weight is 2 1/2 pounds or one
pound heaver than all later M1852 swords with 5/8 in blades. The scabbard is also wider and thicker. Everything looks
more massive and of much higher quality.

 
   Blade has spotting which increase towards the point. Brass work has a rich patina. 

It appears made around the turn of the 20th Century,
and Ames denies knowledge of it. There are two other significant differences between this sword and
later M1852:

 
In addition to the U.S. country of origin introduced in 1892, the first is that
etched on the blade is an oval of fifteen stars. Thirteen stars is what was called for by the official design. Later
M 1852 swords with 5/8″ blades that we inspected, have the same oval, but the count is sixteen stars.
 
The other unusual difference is that on the front and back of the guard is a
small sprig or branch of leafs. It is blank metal in the same place in most other M1852 swords.

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GUARANTEE OF SATISFACTION: You must be fully satisfied with your purchase on arrival
and that our description is entirely accurate or your money back. The only conditions are that an email authorization be obtained
within three days, and that the instrument is returned in its original condition and packaging, and insured for its full value.
Unfortunately, shipping charges are not included in this offer and are non-refundable unless we are at fault.

International
buyers welcome
, but inquire first.  We have satisfied customers in Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bermuda,
British Virgin Islands, Canada, Chile, China, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of Congo, Denmark, Estonia, England, France,
Germany, Greece, Holland, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kuwait, Latvia, Martinique, Mexico,
New Zealand, Norway, Nova Scotia, Panama, Poland, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Romania, Saudi Arabia, Scotland, Singapore,
Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, USVI and the Eastern Caribbean.

ACCEPTED FORMS OF PAYMENT are Bank wire transfer, cashier’s
check, money order, or personal check in which case the item will be held until cleared. No checks from overseas buyers, no
credit cards or PayPal accepted on this item.

This is an example of a high quality M1852 Naval
officer’s sword that has actually seen service. It is worthy of your interest.
Copyright 2009 by Land And Sea Collection™, All
Rights Reserved

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